Permission: Marketing Technology

Updated: Mar 29, 2019



An automated company email that was never signed up for gets deleted or unsubscribed from whenever it is seen in the inbox. Contact lists that provide incentive plus consent for joining earn high click through rates. Questionable information collection through data mining is creepy Black Mirror shit. Using pixels to segment target markets gets the right message to the right person at the right time. Current industry advancements involve tip toeing a fine line between intrusion and sharing.

Three applications of transparency in advertising:

Information collection and use-

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) should not need to exist for companies to be open about people’s info being shared, but it is helpful to have a set of rules to follow just to be clear.

Automations-

Email funnels and chat boxes make it easier to keep in touch with more people at the same time while tracking communication. The more automatic responses, the less opportunity there is to keep customer relationship personalized.

Remarketing-

Is sending someone an ad after they have been to a site helpful or kind of stalkerish? Consider choosing an audience for an ad who maybe has taken a certain action on the site versus targeting someone who bounced for a reason.

One thing most people hate is having their privacy invaded. Asking permission to promote instead of just pushing promotions has an advantage of contributing expected, personalized, and useful content to people who care. Conscious marketers start a conversation with people about what they find valuable to then potentially get approval in offering that value. Factoring technology into marketing helps businesses keep out of other people’s businesses while finding solutions to problems.

Links:

Cambridge Analytica Facebook Data Controversy

GDPR

Marketing Management

Selected Readings in Consumer Neuroscience and Neuromarketing